Are The American People Really Buying “health” In The US Healthcare System?

Are the american people really buying “health” in the US healthcare system?

Brief Patient History: Mr. X Is A 64-year-old Male Admitted To The Unit With

Brief Patient History: Mr. X is a 64-year-old male admitted to the unit with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after emergent left (L)- sided heart catheterization/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Past history includes diabetes mellitus type 2, heart failure, hypertension, and osteoarthritis. Home medications include furosemide Lasix), digoxin (Lanoxin), captopril (Capoten), carvedilol (Coreg), Byetta (exenatide), Glucophage (metformin), and Motrin (ibuprofen). Clinical Assessment: Twenty-four hours after admission to the unit, Mr. X is alert; oriented to person, place, and time; and pain free. His only complaint is shortness of breath and swelling in his ankles, feet, and hands. Physical assessment reveals bilateral breath sounds with basilar crackles; dressing at catheter site; right femoral clean, dry, and intact; peripheral pulses 2 bilaterally; and 2 edema noted in lower extremities. Mr. X has a body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m2 and weighs 100 kg. IV fluids have been discontinued and saline lock is in place in preparation for transfer to the telemetry unit. Diagnostic Procedures: Admission diagnostic studies: Electrocardiogram (ECG) with ST segment elevation in V1-V4; elevated cardiac enzymes; electrolytes and glucose within normal limits; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 26 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 1.8 mg/dL; cholesterol, 250 mg/dL; and serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 300 pg/mL. Current vital signs are as follows: blood pressure of 138/80 mm Hg, heart rate of 108 beats/min (sinus tachycardia), respiratory rate of 28 breaths/min, temperature of 99F, and O2 saturation of 92% on oxygen at 2 L per nasal cannula. Urine output for the past 6 hours is 100 mL. The health care provider is notified of Mr. X’s urine output, and repeat diagnostic studies are ordered that reveal the following: BUN, 56 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 5.6 mg/dL; and potassium, 5.8 mEq/L. Medical Diagnosis Acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction) Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) Major Outcomes Expected for Patient: Prevention of complications from contrast agent, nephrotoxic agents, and acute kidney injury. Fluid and electrolyte Balance Body weight and vital signs are stable and consistent with baseline Patient and family can participate in informed decision making related to patient care Increase knowledge base related to prevented of chronic kidney disease. Questions 1. Describe three problems or risks must be managed to achieve these outcomes? Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Brief Patient History: Mr. X Is A 64-year-old Male Admitted To The Unit With

Brief Patient History: Mr. X is a 64-year-old male admitted to the unit with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after emergent left (L)- sided heart catheterization/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Past history includes diabetes mellitus type 2, heart failure, hypertension, and osteoarthritis. Home medications include furosemide Lasix), digoxin (Lanoxin), captopril (Capoten), carvedilol (Coreg), Byetta (exenatide), Glucophage (metformin), and Motrin (ibuprofen). Clinical Assessment: Twenty-four hours after admission to the unit, Mr. X is alert; oriented to person, place, and time; and pain free. His only complaint is shortness of breath and swelling in his ankles, feet, and hands. Physical assessment reveals bilateral breath sounds with basilar crackles; dressing at catheter site; right femoral clean, dry, and intact; peripheral pulses 2 bilaterally; and 2 edema noted in lower extremities. Mr. X has a body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m2 and weighs 100 kg. IV fluids have been discontinued and saline lock is in place in preparation for transfer to the telemetry unit. Diagnostic Procedures: Admission diagnostic studies: Electrocardiogram (ECG) with ST segment elevation in V1-V4; elevated cardiac enzymes; electrolytes and glucose within normal limits; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 26 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 1.8 mg/dL; cholesterol, 250 mg/dL; and serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 300 pg/mL. Current vital signs are as follows: blood pressure of 138/80 mm Hg, heart rate of 108 beats/min (sinus tachycardia), respiratory rate of 28 breaths/min, temperature of 99F, and O2 saturation of 92% on oxygen at 2 L per nasal cannula. Urine output for the past 6 hours is 100 mL. The health care provider is notified of Mr. X’s urine output, and repeat diagnostic studies are ordered that reveal the following: BUN, 56 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 5.6 mg/dL; and potassium, 5.8 mEq/L. Medical Diagnosis Acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction) Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) Major Outcomes Expected for Patient: Prevention of complications from contrast agent, nephrotoxic agents, and acute kidney injury. Fluid and electrolyte Balance Body weight and vital signs are stable and consistent with baseline Patient and family can participate in informed decision making related to patient care Increase knowledge base related to prevented of chronic kidney disease. Questions 1. Describe three problems or risks must be managed to achieve these outcomes? 2. What interventions must be initiated to monitor, prevent, manage, or eliminate the three problems and risks identified in question #1? Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Brief Patient History: Mr. X Is A 64-year-old Male Admitted To The Unit With

Brief Patient History: Mr. X is a 64-year-old male admitted to the unit with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after emergent left (L)- sided heart catheterization/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Past history includes diabetes mellitus type 2, heart failure, hypertension, and osteoarthritis. Home medications include furosemide Lasix), digoxin (Lanoxin), captopril (Capoten), carvedilol (Coreg), Byetta (exenatide), Glucophage (metformin), and Motrin (ibuprofen). Clinical Assessment: Twenty-four hours after admission to the unit, Mr. X is alert; oriented to person, place, and time; and pain free. His only complaint is shortness of breath and swelling in his ankles, feet, and hands. Physical assessment reveals bilateral breath sounds with basilar crackles; dressing at catheter site; right femoral clean, dry, and intact; peripheral pulses 2 bilaterally; and 2 edema noted in lower extremities. Mr. X has a body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m2 and weighs 100 kg. IV fluids have been discontinued and saline lock is in place in preparation for transfer to the telemetry unit. Diagnostic Procedures: Admission diagnostic studies: Electrocardiogram (ECG) with ST segment elevation in V1-V4; elevated cardiac enzymes; electrolytes and glucose within normal limits; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 26 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 1.8 mg/dL; cholesterol, 250 mg/dL; and serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 300 pg/mL. Current vital signs are as follows: blood pressure of 138/80 mm Hg, heart rate of 108 beats/min (sinus tachycardia), respiratory rate of 28 breaths/min, temperature of 99F, and O2 saturation of 92% on oxygen at 2 L per nasal cannula. Urine output for the past 6 hours is 100 mL. The health care provider is notified of Mr. X’s urine output, and repeat diagnostic studies are ordered that reveal the following: BUN, 56 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 5.6 mg/dL; and potassium, 5.8 mEq/L. Medical Diagnosis Acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction) Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) Major Outcomes Expected for Patient: Prevention of complications from contrast agent, nephrotoxic agents, and acute kidney injury. Fluid and electrolyte Balance Body weight and vital signs are stable and consistent with baseline Patient and family can participate in informed decision making related to patient care Increase knowledge base related to prevented of chronic kidney disease. What interventions should be initiated to promote optimal functioning, safety, and well-being of the patient? Include two interventions. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Brief Patient History: Mr. X Is A 64-year-old Male Admitted To The Unit With

Brief Patient History: Mr. X is a 64-year-old male admitted to the unit with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after emergent left (L)- sided heart catheterization/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Past history includes diabetes mellitus type 2, heart failure, hypertension, and osteoarthritis. Home medications include furosemide Lasix), digoxin (Lanoxin), captopril (Capoten), carvedilol (Coreg), Byetta (exenatide), Glucophage (metformin), and Motrin (ibuprofen). Clinical Assessment: Twenty-four hours after admission to the unit, Mr. X is alert; oriented to person, place, and time; and pain free. His only complaint is shortness of breath and swelling in his ankles, feet, and hands. Physical assessment reveals bilateral breath sounds with basilar crackles; dressing at catheter site; right femoral clean, dry, and intact; peripheral pulses 2 bilaterally; and 2 edema noted in lower extremities. Mr. X has a body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m2 and weighs 100 kg. IV fluids have been discontinued and saline lock is in place in preparation for transfer to the telemetry unit. Diagnostic Procedures: Admission diagnostic studies: Electrocardiogram (ECG) with ST segment elevation in V1-V4; elevated cardiac enzymes; electrolytes and glucose within normal limits; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 26 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 1.8 mg/dL; cholesterol, 250 mg/dL; and serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 300 pg/mL. Current vital signs are as follows: blood pressure of 138/80 mm Hg, heart rate of 108 beats/min (sinus tachycardia), respiratory rate of 28 breaths/min, temperature of 99F, and O2 saturation of 92% on oxygen at 2 L per nasal cannula. Urine output for the past 6 hours is 100 mL. The health care provider is notified of Mr. X’s urine output, and repeat diagnostic studies are ordered that reveal the following: BUN, 56 mg/dL; serum creatinine, 5.6 mg/dL; and potassium, 5.8 mEq/L. Medical Diagnosis Acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction) Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) Major Outcomes Expected for Patient: Prevention of complications from contrast agent, nephrotoxic agents, and acute kidney injury. Fluid and electrolyte Balance Body weight and vital signs are stable and consistent with baseline Patient and family can participate in informed decision making related to patient care Increase knowledge base related to prevented of chronic kidney disease. What possible learning needs would you anticipate for this patient? Include two learning needs. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

A 25 Years’ Girl Who Was Involved In Sexual Activity Years Ago Comes To

A 25 years’ girl who was involved in sexual activity years ago comes to the clinic with distended abdomen complains of fatigue, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. On physical examination, the patient had yellowish skin and yellowish eyes. Laboratory macroscopic examination of stool and urine shows pale stool and dark urine. The pregnant test was negative. a. Discus the possible pathophysiology involved in: I. Skin and eyes changes to yellow in this patient. 15 marks II. Pale stool and dark urine 15 marks b. Discus and justify your possible diagnosis using information provided in this question 10 marks c. To confirm your diagnosis, list and justify for each Laboratory tests you would request and state reasons why. 10 marks Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Briefly Describe An Instance Where There Was A Request For Self Disclosure. (question May

Briefly describe an instance where there was a request for self disclosure. (question may have been invasive). How did you handle the situation, was it effective? If you have never experienced the above, how would you have handled it if you had? Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

What Are The Pros And Cons Of Electronic Health Records? How Will The

What are the pros and cons of electronic health records? How will the HITECH Act ensure that everyone will convert their clinic or hospital to EHRs? As we go forward, what do you think about patients receiving access to their doctor’s notes? List at least two possible measures of health quality ~Be creative! Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

How Can A Provider Decrease Loneliness? Is It Important For Recovery, Why?

How can a provider decrease loneliness? Is it important for recovery, Why? Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

List Therapeutic Purposes For The Use Of Silence And Pauses In The Patient-provider Relationship.

List therapeutic purposes for the use of silence and pauses in the patient-provider relationship. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

What Type Of Information Does The World Health Organization Gives On ADHD?

What type of information does the World Health Organization gives on ADHD? Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Question #8: A) Briefly Discuss The Four Male Client Situations When Perineal Care Would

Question #8: a) Briefly discuss the four male client situations when perineal care would be needed. b) Briefly discuss five female client situations when perineal care would be indicated c) For the following nursing actions state the appropriate rationale: a)For male patient, use a circular motion to cleanse from meatus outwards.b)For male patient, if client is uncircumcised, retract foreskin.c) For female patient, separate labia with gloved non dominant hand to expose urinary meatus and vaginal orifice.d) For female patient, wipe in direction from perineum to rectum. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Question #15: A) Compare Passive ROM, Active ROM, And Active-assisted ROM. B) Describe What

Question #15: a) Compare passive ROM, active ROM, and active-assisted ROM. b) Describe what you would assess before beginning range of motion with your client. c)Outline how you would incorporate ROM exercise into your nursing care. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Discuss The Biological, Individual, And Social Factors That Contribute To A Mother’s Ability To

discuss the biological, individual, and social factors that contribute to a mother’s ability to nurture her new baby. include at least two factors for each factor. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Scenario Ms. Jane Doe Is Your Next Door Neighbor And A Good Friend Of

Scenario Ms. Jane Doe is your next door neighbor and a good friend of yours. You work in an HIM department at Main Street General Hospital. You saw that she just had an outpatient surgery three days ago at your hospital and you now see that she is out working in her flower bed. You really care about your neighbor and friend and don’t want her to overdo it after just coming home from the hospital and having had surgery. What should you do according to HIPAA privacy laws, along with your own opinion? Questions    What possible issues/concerns might this scenario raise? How could this situation become a violation of the law? In this situation, what are some potential negative consequences for you as a neighbor, for you as an employee, for her as a patient, and for the facility? What responses/actions will result in a more positive outcome and/or what proactive measures might be considered? Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

An Athlete Lands On Another Player’s Foot Coming Down From A Rebound And Inverts

An athlete lands on another player’s foot coming down from a rebound and inverts their ankle. They felt a pop, they have moderate swelling, can’t put weight on ankle and pain on the lateral side. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Listed Are The Steps Of The Nursing Process, Give An Example Of How

Listed are the steps of the nursing process, give an example of how the student nurse effectively utilized each step: Assessment: Nursing Diagnosis: Plan consists of Patient goal: Interventions: Implementing: Evaluation Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Part A Which Vitamins Pose The Greatest Risk Of Toxicity? Which Vitamins Pose The

Part A Which vitamins pose the greatest risk of toxicity? Which vitamins pose the greatest risk of toxicity? vitamins A and D vitamins E and B12 vitamins C and K thiamin and riboflavin Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Part A Which Vitamins Pose The Greatest Risk Of Toxicity? Which Vitamins Pose The

Part A Which vitamins pose the greatest risk of toxicity? Which vitamins pose the greatest risk of toxicity? vitamins A and D vitamins E and B12 vitamins C and K thiamin and riboflavin Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Discuss The Biological, Individual, And Social Factors That Contribute To A Mother’s Ability To

discuss the biological, individual, and social factors that contribute to a mother’s ability to nurture her new baby. include at least two factors for each factor. Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

Compare The Roles And Responsibilities Of The Nurse In Advocating For Safe Care

Compare the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in advocating for safe care for individuals, for families, and for communities. Describe how your experiences in advocating for individuals, families, and/or communities could help you to engage in advocacy in the political arena Get help with college essays at Smashing Essays

PLACE THIS ORDER OR A SIMILAR ORDER WITH SMASHING ESSAYS

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