SPS 5024 Globalization and Nation States

Introduction:
 
Globalization, by definition, fundamentally challenges the role and significance of the nation state, the central political institution of the modern world. This course examines how that tension has developed, how it has been managed, and with what results. It does so by:
 

  • Assessing the nation state’s role in relation to key components of globalized economic relations: trade, capital and migratory flows
  • Assessing the responses of nation states to the pressures of globalization, by looking at such issues as taxation and social security spending
  • Examining the role of some of the global institutions constructed by nation states to ‘manage’ globalization, such as the IMF and the World Bank
  • Examining two case studies of recent ‘anti-globalization’ politics, the UK and the USA

 
Course aims:
 

  • To introduce students to a series of topics and debates in the area of globalization
  • To encourage students to think about the variety of questions raised in the study of modern political economy, and situate them in a broad context of economic and political change.
  • To promote the students’ critical understanding of secondary literature across the full range of topics relevant to globalization, including, for example, GATT and tariff issues.
  • To encourage students to express their ideas and put forward arguments on complex subjects in the recent political economy of globalization

 
 
Learning Outcomes:
 
On completion of the course students will be able to:
 

  • demonstrate a critical understanding and systematic knowledge of the the relationship between globalization and the nation state.
  • demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate theories and evidence relevant to the subject
  • demonstrate an ability to apply critical analysis in order to evaluate key issues concerning political decision-making in shaping economic developments
  • demonstrate the capacity to synthesize complex theories from the frontiers of the discipline with appropriately evaluated evidence

 
 
Teaching:
 

  • each two hour class will consist of a mixture of lectures and seminars, with an emphasis on student participation.

 
Coursework:
 

  • students will complete two pieces of assessed work.
  • one assignment will test knowledge of key concepts (1,000 words) and will form 25% of the assessment (Due date: 4.00 pm on Monday 17th February 2020).
  • one essay of 3,000 words which will form 75 % of the assessment (Due date: 4.00 pm on Wednesday 1st April 2020).

 
You must submit two hard copies of the assignment to the box in the Adam Smith building, and also through Urkund electronic submission system
 
 
Extensions:
 

  • As course convenor I am allowed to give an extension for a maximum of three

days if circumstances warrant it. Any extension for longer than this can only
be approved by the programme convenor, Dr Duncan Ross or Prof. Jeffrey Fear.
For other information please consult the School of Social and Political
Sciences Postgraduate Handbook and the M.Sc. Global Economy: Programme
Information in the first instance. If you cannot find the information there then
please contact me.
 
 
Key Concepts:

  • ‘monetary trilemma’ (Mundell/Fleming)
  • ‘embedded liberalism’ (Ruggie)
  • ‘globalization trilemma’ (Rodrik)
  • ‘sovereignty at bay’ (Vernon)
  • ‘race to the bottom’ (Brandeis)
  • ‘borderless world’ (Ohmae)
  • ‘golden straitjacket’ (Friedman)

 
 
Course texts:
 
there is no one textbook for this course, but the following will be useful for many of the key themes:
 

  1. Rodrik, The Globalization Paradox. Why Global Markets, States, and Democracy Can’t Co-exist (2011). E-book

 
Other very useful texts:
 

  1. Clift, Comparative Political Economy. States, Markets and Global Capitalism (2014) GUL ECONOMICS A490 CLI
  2. Hirst, G. Thompson and S. Bromley, Globalization in Question (3rd ed, 2009). GUL HIGH DEMAND POLITICS P307 HIR

L.Mosley, Global Capital and National Governments (2003) GUL ECONOMICS W23 MOS
S.Strange, The Retreat of the State (1996) GUL ECONOMICS Q11 STR4

  1. Dicken, Global Shift (7TH edition 2015). E-book
  2. Holton, Globalization and the Nation State (2nd ed 2011) GUL ECONOMICS P507 HOL2
  3. Rodrik, Has Globalization Gone Too Far? (1999) GUL POLITICS Q313 ROD
  4. Garrett, Partisan Politics in the Global Economy (1998) GUL ECONOMICS B590 GAR
  5. Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents (2002) GUL ECONOMICS P507 STI

Ha Joon Chang, Kicking Away the Ladder. Development Strategy in Historical Perspective (2003) GUL ECONOMICS C820 CHA4
A.Glyn, Capitalism Unleashed; Finance, Globalization and Welfare (2007) E-book

  1. Woods (ed.), The Political Economy of Globalization (2000) ch 5. E-book
  2. Wolf, Why Globalization Works (2004) GUL HIGH DEMAND P507 WOL
  3. Weiss, The Myth of the Powerless State (1998) GUL ECONOMICS C820 WE12
  4. Serra and J. Stiglitz, Washington Consensus Reconsidered (2008) E-book

 
 
Session 1 (14th January) The problem and its setting. Trends and cycles in globalization. The rise and fall (?) of the nation state.
 
Core reading
Rodrik, Globalization Paradox, chs1, 2, 9-12
Speech by Kofi Annan: http://www.li.suu.edu/library/circulation/Gurung/soc4500sgTheRoleOfStateAgeSp12.pdf
Hirst and Thompson, ‘Globalization and the future of the nation state’ Economy and Society 1995, pp.408-424

  1. Wolf, ‘Will the nation state survive globalization?’ Foreign Affairs Jan/Feb 2001 https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/2001-01-01/will-nation-state-survive-globalization

Further reading:
 

  1. O’Rourke and J. Williamson, ‘When did globalization begin?’ European Review of Economic History 6 (2002), pp.23-50
  2. Bordo, A. Taylor and J.Williamson (eds.), Globalization in Historical Perspective (Chicago, 2003) E-book

K.Ohmae, Borderless World (1990) GUL ECONOMICS Q11 OHM
K.Ohmae, The End of the Nation State: the Rise of Regional Economies (1995) GUL ECONOMICS Q313 OHM

  1. Friedman, The Lexus and the Olive Tree (2000) GUL ECONOMICS P507 FRI
  2. Friedman, The World is Flat (2005) SOCIOLOGY A250 FRI12
  3. Leamer, ‘A Flat World?, a Level Playing Field, a Small World, or None of the Above? A review of Friedman’s The World is Flat’ Journal of Economic Literature 65 (2007), pp.83-126

Hirst, Thompson and Bromley, Globalization in Question, pp.1-4 and chapter 2
P.Hirst and G.Thompson, ‘Globalization and the future of the nation state’ Economy and Society 24 (1995), pp.408-424.

  1. Quiggin, ‘Globalization and economic sovereignty’ Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (2001), pp.56-80.
  2. Perraton, ‘The global economy-myths and realities (review article)’ Cambridge Journal of Economics 25 (2001), pp.669-684
  3. Ruggie, ‘International regimes, transactions and change: embedded liberalism in the post-war economic order’ International Organization 36 (1982), pp.379-415
  4. Ruggie, Constructing the World Polity (2002) GUL POLITICS X10 RUG
  5. Weiss, ‘The state-augmenting effects of globalization’, New Political Economy 10(3) (2005), pp. 345-53
  6. Brinkman and J. Brinkman, ‘Globalization and the Nation-state: dead or alive?’ Journal of Economic Issues 42 (2008), pp.425-433
  7. Goldblatt, D. Held, A. McGrew, J. Perraton, ‘Economic globalisation and the nation state’ Soundings 7 Autumn 1997, pp.61-77: http://www.amielandmelburn.org.uk/collections/soundings/07_61.pdf
  8. Reich, The Work of Nations (1992) GUL HIGH DEMAND ECONOMICS BIO66 REI

 
Session 2 (21st January) International trade and the nation state.
 
Core reading:
Rodrik, The Globalization Paradox, chapter 3
http://www.newyorker.com/news/john-cassidy/r-i-p-free-trade-treaties
A.Blinder, ‘Offshoring: the next industrial revolution’ Foreign Affairs 85 (March/April 2006), pp.113-128

  1. Acemoglou et al, ‘The rise of China and the future of US manufacturing’ http://www.voxeu.org/article/rise-china-and-future-us-manufacturing

 
 
Further reading:

  1. Arestis, et al ‘Trade flows revisited: further evidence on globalization’ Cambridge Journal of Economics 36 (2012), pp.481-493
  2. Autor et al, ‘The China Syndrome: Local Labor Market Effects of Import Competition in the United States’ American Economic Review 103 (2013), pp.2121-2168
  3. Haskel, R. Lawrence, E.Leamer, and M. Slaughter, ‘Globalization and U.S. Wages: Modifying

Classic Theory to Explain Recent Facts’ Journal of Economic Perspectives 26 (2012), pp.119-140
http://www.vanderbilt.edu/econ/faculty/Driskill/DeconstructingfreetradeAug27a2007.pdf

  1. Krugman, ‘Trade and wages reconsidered’ Brooking Papers in Economic Activity

http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/projects/bpea/spring-2008/2008a_bpea_krugman.pdf
Rodriguez and Rodrik ‘Trade policy and economic growth. A skeptic’s guide to the cross-national evidence’ http://www.nber.org/chapters/c11058.pdf
J.M.Keynes, ‘National self-sufficiency’ in Keynes, Collected Writings volume XXI (1971) GUL A606.K3 1971

  1. Baicker and M. Rehavi, ‘Policy Watch: Trade Adjustment assistance’ Journal of Economic Perspectives 18 (2004), pp.239-555.
  2. Moore, A World Without Walls (2003) GUL ECONOMICS Q313 MOO
  3. Goldberg and N. Pavcnik, ‘Distributional effects of globalization in developing countries’ Journal of Economic Literature 45 (2007), pp.39-82

 
Session 3 (28th January) MNEs, the nation state and the ‘race to the bottom’ in standards.
 
Core reading:

  1. Vernon, ‘Economic sovereignty at bay’ Foreign Affairs 47 (1968), pp.110-123

L.Eden, ‘The realist adjusts the sails: Vernon and MNE-state relations over three decades’ Journal of International Management 6 (2000) pp.335-342
Hirst, Thompson and Bromley, Globalization in Question, chapter 3.
 
Further reading:
S.J. Kobrin, ‘Sovereignty at bay: globalization, multinational; enterprises and the international political system’ in A. Rugman (ed), Oxford Handbook of International Business, (2009), pp.181-205. Ebook.

  1. Olney, ‘Race to the bottom’, Journal of International Economics 91 (2013), pp.191-203.
  2. Jensen, Nation-states and the Multinational Corporation (Princeton, 2008) GUL ECONOMICS W38 GEN2
  3. Dunning and S. Lunden, Multinational Enterprises and the Global Economy (2008) GUL HIGH DEMAND ECONOMICS F457 DUNN18

W.Olney, ‘A race to the bottom? Employment protection and foreign direct investment’ Journal of International Economics 91 (2013), pp.193-203.

  1. Xing and C. Kolstad, ‘Do lax environmental regulations attract foreign investment?’ Environmental and Resources Economics 21 (2002), pp.1-22.
  2. Wheeler, ‘Racing to the Bottom? Foreign Investment and Air Quality

in Developing Countries’ Journal of Environment & Development, 10 (2001), pp. 225-245

  1. Davies and K.Vadlamannati, ‘A race to the bottom in labour standards? An empirical investigation’ Journal of Development Economics 103 (2013), pp.1-14
  2. Vernon, In the Eye of the Hurricane: the troubled prospects of Multinational Enterprises (Cambridge, Mass. 1998). GUL ECONOMICS F457 VER2
  3. Jones, Entrepreneurship and Multinationals: Global Business and the Making of the Modern World (2013), GUL ECONOMICS F457 JON5 Chapter 9 = G. Jones, ‘The End of Nationality? Global Firms and Borderless Worlds’ Zeitschrift für Unternehmensgeschichte 51 (2006) pp. 149 – 165
  4. Jones Multinationals and Global Capitalism (Oxford, 2005) E-book
  5. Jones, ‘Globalization’ in G. Jones and J. Zeitlin (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business History (Oxford, 2007), pp.141-68. E-book
  6. Brakman and H. Garretsen (eds.), FDI and the Multinational Enterprise (2008) E-book
  7. Jensen, ‘Political risk, democratic institutions and FDI’ The Journal of Politics 70 (2008), pp.1040-1052
  8. Buthe and H. Milner, ‘The politics of FDI into developing countries: increasing FDI through international trade agreements’ American Journal of Political Science 52 (2008), pp.741-62
  9. Dunning (ed.), Governments, Globalization and International Business (1999) E-book

OECD, Annual Reports of OECD Guidelines for Multinationals (Paris, annual)
 
Session 4 (4th January) ‘Short-term’ capital and financial flows
Core reading:
Rodrik, Globalization Paradox, chapter 5

  1. Rodrik and Subramanian, ‘Why did financial globalization disappoint?’ IMF Staff Papers 56 (2009), pp.112-38
  2. Mosley, ‘Globalisation and the state: Still room to move?’ New Political Economy 10 (2005), pp.355-62.
  3. Bhagwati, ‘The capital myth’ Foreign Affairs 77(1998), pp.7-12.

 
Further reading:

  1. Mosley, ‘Room to move: international financial markets and national welfare states’ International Organization 54 (2000), pp.737-773
  2. Goodman and L. Pauly, ‘The obsolescence of capital controls? Economic management in an age of global markets’ World Politics 46 (1993), pp.50-82
  3. Helleiner, ‘Explaining the globalization of financial markets: bringing the states back in’ Review of International Political Economy 2 (1995), pp. 315-341.
  4. Cohen, ‘Phoenix Risen: the resurrection of global finance’ World Politics 48 (1996), pp.268-296.
  5. Irwin, The missing Bretton Woods debate over flexible exchange rates. National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper 23037 (2017). http://www.nber.org/papers/w23037.pdf
  6. Quinn and C. Inclan ‘The origins of financial openness: a study of current and capital account liberalization’ American Journal of Political Science 41 (1997), pp.771-813

L.Mosley, Global Capital and National Governments (2003) GUL ECONOMICS W23 MOS

  1. Kirshner, ‘Keynes, capital mobility and the crisis of embedded liberalism’ Review of International Political Economy 6 (1999), pp.313-337
  2. Pinto, Partisan Investment in the Global Economy (2013) GUL ECONOMICS W38 PIN)

A.Bloomfield, ‘Post-war control of international capital movements’ American Economic Review 36 (1946), pp.687-709

  1. Frieden, Global Capitalism. Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century (2007) GUL ECONOMICS P507 FRI3
  2. Obstfeld and A. Taylor, Global Capital Markets. Integration, Crisis and Growth (Cambridge, 2004) GUL HIGH DEMAND ECONOMICS V181 OBS
  3. Cohen, ‘The resurrection of global finance: review article’ World Politics 48 (1996), pp.268-96

 
Session 5 (11th February) International migration and the role of the nation state.
 
Core reading:
Hirst, Thompson and Bromley, Globalization in Question, pp.29-34

  1. Freeman ‘People flows in globalization’ Journal of Economic Perspectives 20 (2006), pp.145-170

OECD International Migration Outlook, 2019 (OECD, 2018)  https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/c3e35eec-en/index.html?itemId=/content/publication/c3e35eec-en&mimeType=text/htmlesp.  Chapters 1 and 3.
 
 
 
 
Further reading:
 
OECD Perspectives on Global Development, 2017, International Migration in a Shifting World, OECD Publishing (2016), Chapter 1.  https://emnbelgium.be/publication/perspectives-global-development-2017-international-migration-shifting-world-oecd

  1. Hatton and J. Williamson, (eds.), Global Migration and the World Economy (2005) GUL SOCIAL SCIENCES E217 HAT2
  2. Keeley, International Migration: The Human Face of Globalisation (OECD, 2009)

H, Rapaport, Migration and Globalization: What’s in it for Developing Countries? International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 37 Issue: 7, (2016) pp.1209-1226

  1. Docquier and H Rapaport, Globalization, Brain Drain and Development’ Journal of Economic Literature 50:3 (2012) 681-730.
  2. Hatton, ‘Emigration from the UK, 1870-1913 and 1950-1998’ European Review of Economic History 8 (2004), pp.149-71
  3. Collier, Exodus (Oxford, 2013), chapter 4. GUL SOCIAL SCIENCES E33 COL
  4. Castles and M. Miller, The Age of Migration (4TH ed, 2009) GUL HIGH DEMAND SOCIAL SCIENCES E32 CAS4
  5. Bhagwati, In Defence of Globalization (2007), chapter 14 E-book

 
 
Session 6 (18th February) Globalization and the welfare state: Public spending, taxation and social security
 
Core reading:

  1. Rodrik, ‘Why do more open economies have larger governments?’ Journal of Political Economy 106 (1998), pp.997-1032

OECD ‘Corporate tax remains a key revenue source, despite falling rates worldwide’:   https://www.oecd.org/tax/corporate-tax-remains-a-key-revenue-source-despite-falling-rates-worldwide.htm AND http://www.oecd.org/tax/tax-policy/corporate-tax-statistics-database-first-edition.pdf

  1. Iversen and T.Cusack, ‘The causes of welfare state expansion: deindustrialization or globalization?’ World Politics, 52 (2000), pp. 313-349

 
Further reading:

  1. Atkinson, Inequality. What Can be Done? (2015), chapter 10. GUL High Demand Economics B790.15 ATK3
  2. Troeger, ‘Tax competition and the myth of the “race to the bottom”. Why Governments still tax capital’: https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/public/Research/International%20Economics/0213bp_troeger.pdf

M.Devereux et al, ‘Do countries compete over corporate tax rates?’ Journal of Public Economics 92 (2008), pp.1210-1235.

  1. Swank and S. Steinmo, ‘The new political economy of taxation in advanced capitalist democracies’ American Journal of Political Science 46 (2002), pp.642-655

 

  1. Swank, Global Capital, Political Institutions and Policy Change in Developed Welfare States (Cambridge, 2002), chapter 6. GUL POLITICS 4790 SWA
  2. Navarro, ‘Are pro-welfare state and full-employment policies possible in the era of globalization’ International Journal of Health Services 30 (2000), pp.231-251
  3. Garrett, ‘Trade, capital mobility and the domestic politics of economic policy’ International Organization 49 (1995), pp.657-687

A.Walker and C-Kine Wang East Asian Welfare Regimes in Transition: from Confucianism to Globalization (2005) E-book
P.Pierson, The New Politics of the Welfare State (2001) E-book

  1. Tanzi, ‘The Demise of the Nation State?’ http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/wp98120.pdf
  2. Rodrik, ‘Capital mobility, distributional conflict and international tax co-ordination’ GUL ECONOMICS PT139 NBE no 7150
  3. Goldberg and N. Pavcnik, ‘Distributional effects of globalization in developing countries’ Journal of Economic Literature 45 (2007), pp.39-82
  4. Murphy, The Joy of Tax? (2015)

 
Session 7 (25th February) Global Institutions and Nation States: the WTO
 
Core reading:
Rodrik, Globalization Paradox, chapters 4 and 8

  1. Meltzer, ‘State sovereignty and the legitimacy of the WTO’ https://www.law.upenn.edu/journals/jil/articles/volume26/issue4/Meltzer26U.Pa.J.Int’lEcon.L.693(2005).pdf
  2. Stiglitz, Making Globalization Work (2007), chapter 3 GUL ECONOMICS P507 STI
  3. Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents (2002), chapter 9 GUL ECONOMICS P507 STI

 
Further reading:

  1. van Bossche, The Law and Policy of the WTO (3RD ed. 2013), pp.1-40, 74-148. HIGH DEMAND Law L46BO53
  2. Moore, A World Without Walls (2003) GUL ECONOMICS Q313 MOO
  3. Rodrik, ‘Review’ of Moore, A World Without Walls in Foreign Affairs 82 (2003), pp.135-140.
  4. Kim, ‘Does the WTO promote trade?’ Journal of International Trade and Economic Development 19 (2010), pp.421-37.
  5. Michalopoulos, Emerging Powers in the WTO (2013) Ebook.
  6. Sorensen, ‘Free markets for all’ in D. Claes and C. Knutsen (eds.), Governing the Global Economy (2011), pp.70-90 GUL ECONOMICS P507 CLA2

A.Rugman, The End of Globalization (2000), chapter 2 GUL F457 RUG 6

  1. Ostry, ‘The multilateral trading system’ in A. Rugman and T. Brewer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Business (2001), pp.232-258 GUL ECONOMICS F457 RUG7

A.K Rose, ‘Do we really know that the WTO increases trade?’ American Economic Review, 94 (2004) pp. 98-114

  1. Panitchpakdi and M. Clifford, China and the WTO (2002), GUL Q204 PAN.

 
 
 
Session 8 (3rd March) Global Institutions and Nation States: the IMF
 
Core reading:

  1. Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents (2002), especially chapters 3,4, 8, and 9.

IMF, “The liberalization and management of capital flows: an institutionalist
view”, (14 November 2012),
http://www.imf.org/external/np/pp/eng/2012/111412.pdf

  1. Boughton, ‘From Suez to tequila: the IMF as crisis manager’ Economic Journal 110 (2000), pp.273-291

 
Further reading:

  1. Babb, ‘The Washington Consensus as transnational policy paradigm: its origins, trajectory and likely successor’ Review of International Political Economy 20 (2013), pp.268-297.
  2. Chwieroth, Capital Ideas: The IMF and the Rise of Financial Liberalization (2010) GUL ECONOMICS V181.5 CHW
  3. Keohane and A. Underdal ‘The West and the rest in global economic institutions’ in D. Claes and C. Knutsen (eds.), Governing the Global Economy (2011), pp.51-69 GUL ECONOMICS P507 CLA2
  4. Copelovitch, The International Monetary Fund in the Global Economy:Banks, Bonds, and Bailouts (2010) esp. chs 1-3 GUL ECONOMICS V181.5 COP

A.Krueger, ‘Whither the world bank and the IMF?’ Journal of Economic Literature 36 (1998), pp.1983-2020

  1. Blanchard, G. Dell’Ariccia and P. Mauro, ‘Rethinking Macroeconomic Policy’ IMF Staff Position Note 2010 https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/spn/2010/spn1003.pdf

IMF, “The liberalization and management of capital flows: an institutionalist
view”, (14 November 2012),
http://www.imf.org/external/np/pp/eng/2012/111412.pdf
 
 
Session 9 (10th March):  globalisation, national policies and the crisis and recovery from 2007
 
Core reading:

  1. Thompson, ”Financial globalization” and the “crisis”: a critical account and “What is to be done”’ New Political Economy 15 (2010), p.127-146

G20 SUMMIT April 2009: https://www.imf.org/external/np/sec/pr/2009/pdf/g20_040209.pdf

  1. Pauly, ‘Managing Financial Emergencies in an Integrating World’ Globalizations 6 (2009), pp. 353–64 http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/pauly/selected_publications/Pauly%20Globalizations%20Article%20Final.pdf

Further reading:
Rodrik, Globalization Paradox, chapters, 11 and 12.

  1. Blanchard, G. Dell’Ariccia and P. Mauro, ‘Rethinking Macroeconomic Policy’ IMF Staff Position Note 2010: https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/spn/2010/spn1003.pdf
  2. Helleiner, ‘Multilateralism reborn? International co-operation and the global financial crisis’ in . NBermeo and J. Pontusson (eds), Coping with Crisis. Government Reactions to the Great Recession (2012), pp.65-90. GUL ECONOMICS A4055 BER4.

C.Adam and D. Vines, ‘Remaking macroeconomic policy after the global financial crisis: a balance sheet approach’ Oxford Review of Economic Policy 25 (2009), pp.507-552.
G20 SUMMIT November 2008: http://www.g20.utoronto.ca/summits/2008washington.html
China and the G20: http://www.economist.com/node/13398646
The US and the G20: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=axEnb_LXw5yc&refer=home

  1. Wren-Lewis, ‘Macroeconomic policy in the light of the credit crunch: the return of counter-cyclical fiscal policy?’ Oxford Review of Economic Policy 26 (2010), pp.71-86

J.Lybeck, A Global History of the Financial Crash of 2007-10 (2011) GUL ECONOMICS A 4055 LYB

  1. Blyth, Austerity. The History of a Dangerous Idea (Oxford, 2013) GUL HIGH DEMAND ECONOMICS YR15 BLY

 
 
Session 10: (17th March) Anti-globalization and the nation state:  a) the UK and Brexit
 
Core reading:

  1. Coyle, ‘Brexit and globalisation’ Vox http://voxeu.org/article/brexit-and-globalisation
  2. Reinhart ‘Brexit’s blow to globalization’ Project Syndicate https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/brexit-blow-to-globalization-by-carmen-reinhart-2016-06

Lord Ashcroft, ‘How the UK voted on Thursday…and why’: http://lordashcroftpolls.com/2016/06/how-the-united-kingdom-voted-and-why/

  1. Tomlinson, ‘Brexit, Globalization and Deindustrialization’ April 2017:

http://voxeu.org/article/brexit-globalisation-and-de-industrialisation
 
Further reading:

  1. Hirst and G.Thompson, ‘Globalization in one country?’ Economy and Society 29 (2000), pp.335-356
  2. Clift & J. Tomlinson ‘When Rules Started to Rule: The IMF, Neo-Liberal Economic Ideas, and Economic Policy in Britain’ Review of International Political Economy 19 (2012), pp.377-400

C.Schenk, ‘The origins of the Eurodollar market in London: 1955-1963’ Explorations in Economic History 35 (1998), pp.221-238

  1. Clift & J. Tomlinson ‘Credible Keynesianism? New Labour Macroeconomic Policy and the Political Economy of Coarse Tuning’ British Journal of Political Science 37 (2007), pp.47-69
  2. Clift & J. Tomlinson, Negotiating credibility? Britain and the IMF from 1956 to 1976’ Contemporary European History 17 (2008), pp.545-566
  3. Brown, Beyond the Crash. Overcoming the First Crisis of Globalization (2010)

C.Schenk, ‘The new City and the state in the 1960s’ in R. Michie and P.Williamson (eds.), The British Government and the City of London in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge, 2004), pp.322-39

  1. Burn, The Re-emergence of Global Finance (2006) E-book
  2. Helleiner, ‘Explaining the globalization of financial markets: bringing the states back in’ Review of International Political Economy 2 (1995), pp. 315-341
  3. Thompson, ‘The nation-state and international capital flows in historical perspective’ Government and Opposition 32 (1997), pp.84-113
  4. Michie and J. Grieve-Smith, Managing the Global Economy (1995) GUL ECONOMICS C820 MIC
  5. Runge Briefing: Overview of Evidence on Economic Impacts of EU Immigration NIESR, 19 August 2019 https://www.niesr.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/NIESR%20Briefing%20Economic%20Impacts%20of%20EU%20Immigration.pdf
  6. Rolfe et.al. Post-Brexit Immigration Policy: Reconciling Public Perceptions with Economic Evidence (NIESR 2018) https://www.niesr.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/FINAL%20Leverhulme%20report%20FINAL.pdf

 
 
 
Session 11 (24th March) Anti-globalization and the nation state: b) The USA versus China
 
Core reading:
 

  1. Klein, ‘How many US manufacturing jobs were lost to globalisation?’: https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2016/12/06/2180771/how-many-us-manufacturing-jobs-were-lost-to-globalisation/
  2. Griswold,’ America’s misunderstood trade deficit’: https://www.cato.org/publications/congressional-testimony/americas-misunderstood-trade-deficit

Wei, Shang-Jin, Zhuan Xie, and Xiaobo Zhang, From “Made in China” to “Innovated in China”: Necessity, Prospect, and Challenges.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 31 (2017), pp. 49-70.
 
 
 
Further Reading:
 
Brad de Long, ‘America’s superpower panic’: https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/america-china-superpower-rivalry-history-by-j-bradford-delong-2019-08

  1. Irwin, ‘The false promise of protectionism’ Foreign Affairs May/June 2017.
  2. Zhu, ‘Understanding China’s growth: past, present, and future’ Journal of Economic Perspectives, 26 (2012), pp.103-124.
  3. Bernanke,‘ China’s trilemma and a possible solution’https://www.brookings.edu/blog/ben-bernanke/2016/03/09/chinas-trilemma-and-a-possible-solution/

L.Liew, ‘US trade deficits and Sino-US relations’ Journal of Contemporary Asia 40 (2010), pp.656-763.

  1. Prasad, ‘China’s efforts to expand the international role of the Renminbi’
  1. Ben-Atar, ‘Alexander Hamilton’s Alternative: technology policy and the report on manufactures’ William and Mary Quarterly 52 (1995), p.389-414 https://www-jstor-org.ezproxy.lib.gla.ac.uk/stable/pdf/2947292.pdf?refreqid=search%3Aae20db44fcca1c9bfa8dcf0e87b7986d

 
Paul Krugman, ‘Krugman on Trump, China, Trade Wars’ video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mHR9lngS3o
 

  1. Haskel et al, Globalization and US wages: modifying classical theory to explain recent facts’ Journal of Economic Perspectives 26 (2012), pp.119-139.
  2. Baicker and M. Rehavi, ‘Policy watch: Trade Adjustment Assistance’ Journal of Economic Perspectives 18 (2004), pp. 239-255.

 

  1. Ferchen, ‘Whose China model is it anyway? The contentious search for consensus’ Review of International Political Economy 20 (2013), pp.390-420.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Essay titles:

  • To what extent, if at all, has the expansion of MNEs undermined national sovereignty?
  • What is the case for reducing restrictions on international migration?
  • Has there been a ‘race to the bottom’ in standards as a result of globalization?
  • Why has the trend in welfare state spending been upwards in most countries over the last 50 years?
  • How important has the WTO been in helping national governments achieve their economic policy aims?
  • What was the ‘Washington Consensus’? Did it help or hinder national governments in achieving their economic policy aims?
  • Was the Brexit decision in 2016 a vote against globalization?
  • Assess the impact of the Trump Presidency’s attempts to ‘reverse globalization’.
  • What did the crisis which began in 2008 show about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of national governments in economic policy?
  • Why did restrictions on international capital flows break down from the 1950s?

You may submit an essay on another r

 
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Dunning’s Eclectic Paradigm

  • The assignment is an academic essay, not a business REPORT.
  • The basic requirements:

1) use Dunning’s eclectic paradigm as the theoretical framework;
2) choose a multinational from a case list;
3) use data and diagrams/charts to support analysis.

  • The word count is [2000 (-/+10%)] and excludes references. Diagrams and figures would be counted as 10 words.
  • References include 10 to 15 articles.

Please select ONE company from the list below in explaining how it manages FDI in an emerging market or a developed economy,
 

  • Volkswagen (Germany)
  • Walmart (US)
  • Tata (India)
  • Foxconn (Taiwan)

For example, Volkswagen invests in China or Tata invests in the UK.
Basic Structure

  • Introduction (100 words)
  • Literature Review/Critiques (300 words)
  • Ownership (500 words)
  • Location (500 words)
  • Internalization (500 words)
  • Conclusion (100 words)
  • References
 
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ULMS863: ORGANISATIONAL THEORY: BEHAVIOUR, POWER AND POLITICS AT WORK

Assessment Strategy

This module will be assessed in the following way:
 
Individual Assignment (100%)
 
Question:
Please select and elaborate on one of the weekly themes, discuss and critically evaluate why it may be an important aspect in management and organizational context. Illustrate your ideas with an empirical case from contemporary organizations.
 
N.B. This question is written in such a way as to give you a wide degree of choice over how it is to be answered. Your empirical case can be an actual organization; or an organizational setting; or a specific management problem to be solved; or a specific industry. Your choice of empirical case will be assessed by how well it helps illustrations of theories.
 
N.N.B. You will have opportunity to discuss your chosen approach with the module leader in person and there will also be a designated assignment preparation tutorial.
 
Word count: 3,000 words
Type(s) of assessment: See module specification: Section 4, Assessments
 
Submission deadlines and date of return of work to students:
 
Submission Deadline: 12 noon on 20th/April/2020
Date of feedback return: 12 noon on 11th/May/2020
 
How to submit your work:
 
This coursework requires online submission only.  You do not need to submit a hard copy of the coursework. You should submit your coursework via Turnitin, which is a plagiarism and collusion detection system. If you do not submit to Turnitin your work will not be marked.
 
To submit via Turnitin, you go to the assessment area for the module on VITAL and you will find a link for the coursework. Click on View/Complete and then on the “submit” icon for the paper. You are then prompted to submit a title for the paper. Use the “browse” button to locate the file you want to submit, then click “submit”. You will then be asked to confirm that you want to submit by clicking the “Yes, submit” button.”
Maximum length of coursework elements: See module specification: Section 4, Assessments
 
Students are asked to note that the word count is the absolute upper limit. There is no leeway over this, i.e. you will be penalised if you submit work that exceeds the word limit (the suggestion that you may exceed the word count by 10% is a myth!)
The following are not included in word counts:
 
Reference lists/bibliographies and question titles
Appendices/footnotes – provided these have been used only when necessary. If appendices or footnotes are used excessively, or contain material which should clearly be included in the main body of the essay/report, it is at the markers’ discretion to include these in the word count.
Tables/graphs – provided these have been imported from elsewhere (correctly referenced) and not produced by the student.
Contents pages and front pages of reports
As well as the essay/report itself, the following are included in word counts:
Citations/quotations – this includes the material paraphrased/quoted itself as well as the name, date and page information.
Tables and graphs – if they have been produced by the student.
Executive summaries in reports unless otherwise stated.
 
Will feedback on draft coursework be given?
 
Feedback on draft assignment should be less than 2 pages and the turnaround time for feedback is 5 working days.
 
Weighting of the assessment components: See module specification: Section 4, Assessments
 
 
Policies for the below can be found via:
 
https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/intranet/management-school/assessment/
 
Re-sits
Penalties – presentation, use of Wikipedia, late submission
Referencing work
Marking criteria
ULMS group work policy
Requests for extensions
 
 

Feedback to Students

Assignment feedback will be provided as follows:
Within three weeks of submission; individual feedback on coursework provided online through the Turnitin Grademark facility; face-to-face feedback available by appointment

How can I feed back my views on this module?

 
Your feedback on the module is welcome at any time. You will be given an opportunity to provide early module feedback informally, and then formally at the end of the module via the formal module evaluation process. The sooner you alert us to any issues you might have the quicker we can resolve them. Please don’t leave it to the end of the module to tell us if you are struggling!
Please be reminded of the ULMS Guidance on Providing Feedback (see your student handbook). Giving constructive feedback is a skill that you will need to develop in the workplace. We welcome feedback that is constructive and specific (it helps us improve), but please remain polite and be aware of the right of every staff member to Dignity at Work. There is lots of evidence of unconscious bias in module evaluation – based on gender, age, race, etc. – so please be aware of this and try to be fair to all staff.

Lecture Programme:

 
 

Week Date
 
Topic Lead
 
1
 
 
27/01/2020
 
Introduction to the module:
How do we understand organisations?
 
 
Dr. Yihan Liu
 
 
2
 
03/02/2020
Building on the principles of evidence-based management
 
 
 
 
Prof. Yves Guillaume
 
 
3
 
10/02/2020
Work-life balance and diversity
 
 
Prof. Rory Donnelly
 
 
 
 
4
 
17/02/2020
A paradigm shift: Critical Management Studies Dr. Yihan Liu
 
5
 
24/02/2020
Culture, diversity and organisation Dr. Huadong Yang
 
 
 
6
 
02/03/2020
Organisation, space and history
 
Dr. Kathleen Stephenson
 
7  
09/03/2020
 
Organisations in a state of flux
 
Prof. Mike Zundel
8  
16/03/2020
Conclusion and assignment
preparation
 
Dr. Yihan Liu
Easter Vacation
Assignment Submission Date: 20th/April/2020

 
*The titles for each topic are working titles and, as such, they may vary, and may be subject to change due to guest speaker availability
 

Seminar Sessions:

 
Your seminar leaders for the ULMS863 will be Scott Baker and Thomas Davis. They are very experienced, supportive and approachable Graduate Teaching Assistants with extensive knowledge of organisation theory. The seminars will be managed in an innovative, flexible way. We are pleased to say that the exact format will likely vary each session because the lectures are delivered by invited expert speakers who will decide on the most appropriate seminar format for their session. Having a degree of variation in approach will help keep things fresh, interesting and stimulating.
 
 

Core and Recommended Reading

 
Core: King, D. and Lawley, S. (2017) Organisational Behaviour (2nd Edition). Oxford: OUP.
 
 
Please take your time to read a wide selection of articles on organisation theory. The list below is a very small snapshot of the relevant literature and, therefore, should not be considered definitive. Also, each session delivered by the guest speakers will likely include additional reading suggestions. It is important that you explore this material, and the wide variety of other literature available, because doing so will aid your learning generally, increasing your confidence, and help you prepare well for the assessments.
 
An important feature of the module is the focus on original texts setting out the key arguments considered. Reading a generic text (such as King and Lawley, 2017 – details below) summarising those ideas can be very helpful but considering ideas in the original is usually much more illuminating, not least because there is more detail and also because the original includes the author’s own articulation of ideas and her/his choice of illustrative examples.
 
Books
If you want a general text examining many of the themes discussed during the module, please start with King and Lawley (2017). Multiple copies of this book are held in the Sydney Jones library. However, you should keep in mind that no single book can cover everything required and, therefore, you will need to read beyond this text.
 
Casey, C. (1996) Work, Self and Society: After Industrialism. London: Routledge.

Foucault, M. (1977). Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Vintage.
Gatrell, C., & Swan, E. (2008). Gender and diversity in management: A concise introduction. Sage.

Giddens, A. (1991) Modernity and Self-Identity: self and Society in the Late Modern Age. Cambridge: Polity Press.
Goffman, E. (1959) The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. London: Penguin
Hofsetede, G. (2003) Culture’s Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviours, Institutions and Organisations across Nations. London: Sage.
Knights, D. and Willmott, H. (1999) Management Lives: Power and Identity in Work Organisations. London: Sage.
Morgan, G. (2006) Images of Organisation. London: Sage.
Parker, M. (2000) Organisational Culture and Identity. London: Sage.
Rose, N. (1990). Governing the soul: the shaping of the private self. Taylor & Frances/Routledge.
Scott, J. C. (1998) Seeing like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition have Failed. Yale: Yale University Press.
Sennett, R. (1998) The Corrosion of Character: Personal Consequences of Work in the new Capitalism. New York: W.W. Norton and Co.
 
Journal Articles

The journal articles listed below are a small sample of those likely to be helpful during the course of the module. As mentioned above, there will be others recommended by the weekly speakers and you should also conduct extended research on relevant journal articles.
 
Collinson, D. L. (1999). Surviving the rigs’: Safety and surveillance on North Sea oil installations. Organization studies, 20:4, 579-600.
Gatrell, C. J. (2013). Maternal body work: How women managers and professionals negotiate pregnancy and new motherhood at work. Human Relations, 66:5, 621-644.
McSweeney, B. (2002) ‘Hofstede’s model of national cultural differences and their consequences: a triumph of faith – a failure of analysis’. Human Relations, 55:1, pp89-118.
Scholarios, D. And Marks, A. (2004) ‘Work-life balance and the software worker’. Human Resource Management Journal, 14:2, pp54-74.

 
The library aims to provide a minimum ratio of one book per ten students for essential texts. But if more copies are needed and funds permit, it can purchase extra copies. The Library needs to find out which books are in greatest demand and you can help by taking these steps:
1) Place a reservation on the book. Once you have the book details on the library catalogue screen, click Request. This means as soon as a copy is returned, you will be notified and can borrow it. It also means that library staff are notified of the demand on the book.
2) Fill in a book suggestion form, talk to staff at the library’s information support desks or contact your Liaison Librarian to let us know more copies are needed. The current Liaison Librarian for the Management School is Nicola Gregory, nicola.gregory@liverpool.ac.uk
 

Electronic Resources

The University website at http://www.liv.ac.uk/library/ provides you with access to a number of relevant electronic journals and databases. A helpful first step is to search on a topic of interest using the library’s ‘Discover’ search facility.
 
Journals
Academy of Management Journal
Academy of Management Perspectives
Academic of Management Proceedings
Human Relations
International Journal of Management Reviews
Journal of Management Studies
Organizational Studies
Organization
Sociology
Work, Employment and Society
 
 

Sign-off

Document last revised on 30th December 2019 by Dr. Yihan Liu
 
 
 

THE ULMS GRADUATE – LEARNING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

 
 
The ULMS Graduate is:
 
Flexible and adaptable
Our graduates understand that the business world develops and changes quickly, and ULMS will provide them with opportunities to develop the skills needed to be open to the challenges this brings.
 
A problem solver
Our graduates are provided with opportunities to develop their critical and analytical skills from the day they join the School. By learning to think creatively, to persevere with an issue and to draw on the resources available to them, our graduates approach difficult situations confident that they can reach a successful outcome and make a difference.
 
Numerate
Maths is an essential element of all of our programmes and our graduates are confident and competent when using numbers to analyse situations, solve problems and make decisions.
 
Commercially aware
The teaching at ULMS is drawn from the latest business and management research, ensuring that our graduates understand the environment in which they begin their careers.
 
A team player
Our graduates understand the importance of contributing to a team. By contributing to group work our students understand the dynamics of a team and the importance of individual roles and how each can make a difference to achieving a result.
 
Organised and able to work under pressure
ULMS graduates learn to manage their time carefully during their studies. Our graduates are motivated to learn outside the classroom and are adept at managing deadlines and dealing with conflicting demands upon their time.
 
An excellent communicator
The ULMS syllabus requires students to demonstrate their aptitude for communicating throughout their studies. Their skills include writing essays, business reports and case studies, giving presentations, listening to and questioning guest speakers and using negotiating and persuasion skills to argue a point during a class debate. Our graduates understand the difference that effective communication can make to a situation.
 
IT literate
Our graduates understand the importance of IT in the modern business environment and ensure that their digital literacy skills are up-to-date in order to use it successfully. They understand how to prepare and analyse spreadsheets, can write reports and use IT to enhance presentations. They are confident users of electronic databases and are skilled at finding and evaluating appropriate and relevant information from electronic sources.
 
Internationally aware
The ULMS teaching and research community is drawn from around the world and our students are exposed to business ideas and cultures from beyond the UK. Many graduates make the most of international opportunities available to them, from participating in overseas exchanges to participating in international inter-university business games.
 
A lifelong learner
ULMS graduates understand that the end of their degree programme does not mean the end of their learning journey. Our students understand the importance of continually building skills and knowledge in order to maintain commercial awareness, to be able to follow a flexible career path and to continue to make a difference throughout their working lives.
 
Ethically aware
The ULMS teaching, learning and assessment strategy ensures that all graduates are exposed to ideas of business ethics whilst studying and that they have an understanding of the difference business can make in the wider community and across the world.
 
A leader
We instil our graduates with the confidence to lead others by providing opportunities within the curriculum to debate ideas, present research, solve problems and make difficult decisions.
 
 
           
 
 

 
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BHO0034 Cross Cultural Studies

Learning Outcomes
 
This assessment task addresses the following learning outcomes from the module specification
1.             Outline and explain the concept of national culture and how it influences behaviours in the workplace
2.             Critically comment upon the implications of the link between national culture and behaviour for organisations.
7.          Critically appraise the various cultural issues that operate within a business environment.
9.           Identify and reflect upon their culture of origin.
 
 
Assessment brief
This assignment consists of an individual academic blog composed of 5 posts; the format of an academic post resembles that of a mini-essay. This means you are required to originally elaborate on existing academic literature.
 
Each post should:
1.    Refer to a specific topic (of your choice) covered during one of the lectures; the assignment should consist of 1 individual reflective comments, 1-2 topic from Term 1 and 2-3 topics from Term 2 (Five posts in total);
2.    Present an original title (which you elaborate);
3.    Present 3 keywords for each topic;
4.    Elaborate on the topic you choose in 500 words maximum (excluding title, keywords and references);
5.    Present a clear structure, with a couple of introductory sentences stating what the post is about and why the topic is important. A couple of conclusive sentences, summing up the main points are also expected;
6.    Present 4 references at least: 2 of them should be academic journals or scholarly books (please take inspiration from our reading list and literature presented during the lectures, but conduct your own search as well).
 
Overall the blog should not be more than 2500 words longer (excluding cover page, titles, keywords and references), and should be formatted following the layout attached (please see below).
 
 
 
COVER PAGE
BHO0034 – CROSS CULTURAL STUDIES 2019/20
 
MODULE CONVENOR: Dr. Lianghui Lei
 
ACADEMIC BLOG by
 
STUDENT NAME
STUDENT NUMBER
 
 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BLOG POST 1 [please insert title of your post]
 
BLOG POST 2 [please insert title of your post]
 
BLOG POST 3 [please insert title of your post]
 
BLOG POST 4 [please insert title of your post]
 
BLOG POST 5 [please insert title of your post]
 
 
 

BLOG POST 1 [please insert title of your post]

 
from Lecture [include lecture’s title and date]
 
 
Keywords: keyword 1, keyword 2, keyword 3
 
 
Text [max 500 words]
 
 
References
 
[please include 4 at least: 2 of them should be academic journals or scholarly books]
 
 
PLEASE REPLICATE THIS SAME STRUCTURE FOR THE NEXT 4 POSTS!
 
 
 
 

You are advised to:      
 
  • Avoid description of the content of material referred to – critical evaluation is required where specified.

·         Work should be referenced in APA 6th style.  The link below is to the library guidance on referencing and it is recommended you use these resources to ensure your references are in the correct format.
 
·         http://www.hud.ac.uk/library/finding-info/informationskills/evaluation/referencing/
 
Note that poorly referenced material will lose you marks (make sure you consult the Learning Development Group Tutors on level 1 of the Business School for any additional help needed). You can access APA 6th via Brightspace by clicking on the Library button to access the easy to use online guide.

  • Read widely from textbooks, journals and authoritative commentaries in forming your views. 
  • Refer back to your tutorial work and notes where you have covered key issues and developed critical argument that is relevant to the requirement of this assessment.
  • Pay close attention to the Assessment Criteria at the end of this document – this lists general assessment criteria and specific criteria to the requirements of this assignment.  These criteria will be used to inform your electronic feedback on your marked assignment.
  • Do not exceed the word limit. A 5% mark penalty applies for work exceeding the word limit.

 

 
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BHO0255 The Psychology of Work and Organisations

Learning Outcomes
This assessment task addresses the following learning outcomes from the
module specification
Knowledge and Understanding Outcomes
• Have acquired a clear understanding of the role of psychology in organisational settings.
• Have developed a critical appreciation of current research trends and findings, research
methodologies employed presently and historically, and the contribution these make to the
understanding of organisational behaviour.
• Be able to critically evaluate the underpinning issues and assumptions of the theories and
principles of psychology within an organisational context through reflecting upon the application of
theory at work.
• Be able to critically assess the current status of the discipline and prospective future directions.
Ability Outcomes
• Demonstrate knowledge of the role of psychology in organisational settings.
• Critically appraise the issues and assumptions of the theories and principles of psychology within
an organisational context.
• Assess the main contributors to the discipline and understand the development of the field and its
value in business and in psychology.
• Evaluate advanced theoretical knowledge showing how organisations engage with psychologists to
resolve issues presented by businesses, people and their resources.
Assessment brief
Case study task:
Drawing on research in work and organisational psychology (measuring talent/identifying
talent and developing talent) make recommendations for how Google can improve their
approach to measuring/identifying talent and developing talent and critically address the
potential strengths and weaknesses of your recommendations.
2
Your answer MUST be based on the Google Case study provided on pages 3-6 of
this document.
Your essay should include the following sections:
1. Introduction (Approximately 100 words)
In the introduction, you should also briefly outline what you will cover in the main body of
your essay.
2. Theoretical background (Approximately 650 words)
In the theoretical background you are expected to Introduce the reader to the relevant
psychological literature (Measuring Talent/Identifying Talent and Developing talent).
3. Recommendations (Approximately 650 words)
Based on the literature presented in your theoretical background, make recommendations
for how Google can improve their approach to measuring/identifying and developing talent
and critically address the potential strengths and weaknesses of your recommendations.
5. Conclusion (Approximately 100 words)
Summarise the main points covered in the main body of your essay.
You are advised to:
• Avoid merely describing theories/methods and concepts. Whilst descriptive
accounts are an important way to demonstrate your understanding of the
module content, you must also critically evaluate/discuss them. A critical
approach to essay writing is essential at this level of academic study.
• Work should be written/cited/referenced in APA 6th edition style. You can
access APA 6th edition via Brightspace by clicking on the Library button to
access the easy to use online guide.
• Read widely from textbooks and academic journals to inform your
points/arguments. Please DO NOT refer to lecture slides in your essay.
• Pay close attention to the Assessment Criteria at the end of this document –
this lists general assessment criteria and specific criteria to the
requirements of this assignment. These criteria will be used to inform your
electronic feedback on your marked assignment.
• Finally, do not show or send your work to anyone on your course

 
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BHS0035 Module Title: Strategy in Context

                        Criteria EXPLANATION
Case Study Content
Your case study answers the questions set out in the assignment brief. The assignment asks you to explain why a particular organisation made a particular strategic decision. Your completed case study should focus on this explanation. Simply describing the decision, providing an external and/or internal analysis of the organisation, or evaluating the quality of the decision will not answer the assignment question.
The discussion in the case study is informed by relevant theory. Your explanations of why your chosen organisation made the decision must be grounded in theory. In other words, when searching for explanations, you must consider factors set out in the various theoretical perspectives we discussed in this module. You are expected to use a minimum of three or four different theoretical perspectives.
Please avoid exclusively relying on basic planning models such as PESTLE and SWOT. Using basic planning models only will result in a basic pass mark at best.
Your writing demonstrates a solid understanding of the theoretical perspectives you are using. Please make sure that you understand the theoretical perspectives and models you use very well – e.g. what they are intended for, how they work and how they are related to other perspectives.
You are not required to explain in your case study the theoretical perspectives you use. However, the way you use concepts and ideas from those perspectives will provide an indication of your understanding.
Your case study is based on thorough research of your organisation’s decision, the organisation itself and the situation within which the decision was made. You are expected to use a variety of sources to obtain information about your chosen organisation, about the decision that you are analysing and about any relevant circumstantial factors (e.g. various aspects of the external and internal environment, important stakeholders, organisational processes, etc.). Relying on just one or two sources will most likely not be enough.
Please also be aware of potential biases – e.g. your organisation’s own accounts of how the decision was made may not be objective.
Your case study should address the power dimension of organisational decision-making. In your analysis, you should consider how the various forces both in the internal and external environment of the organisation forced or encouraged the organisation to make the decision. These forces may have exerted a direct coercive impact on the organisation (e.g. stakeholder demands), facilitated the decision (e.g. existence of particular resource sets), or set out the boundaries for organisational imagination (e.g. organisational culture and structure). You should also consider the relationships between the various forces.
Case Study Structure
Your case study has a clear introduction. The introduction should provide a brief overview of the organisation that you chose and the decision that you will be explaining. It should contain a phrase such as “In this case study, I will explain how an organisation X reached the decision Y”. You can also provide a brief list of the theoretical perspectives you will use.
Your case study is a coherent narrative. You present your points/arguments in a logical sequence. The structure of the main body of the case study should support a clear communication of the results of your analysis. As this is a fairly long case study, you should split it into several sections. Each section should deal with a specific topic – e.g. background information, the description of the decision-making process, a particular influencing factor, or the discussion of the relationship between particular influencing factors.
Please do not title the main body of your case study “Main body”. The words “main body” are simply used to denote the main substantive section of a piece of writing. They are not an appropriate section title.
The case study must have a clear conclusion, summarising the findings of your analysis. In your conclusion, you should provide a clear outline the key reasons why your organisation made the decision.
Evidence and Referencing
All arguments you make must be supported by evidence, either theoretical or empirical. Your arguments and explanations should be based on thorough research and careful consideration of relevant evidence. Avoid making arguments without supporting them with relevant evidence.
All non-common-knowledge facts and arguments are referenced. You should provide a clear indication of the sources of your evidence by thoroughly referencing your writing. Please use either an APA or Harvard referencing style.
The sources used are up-to-date and appropriate for an academic work Avoid using blogs, social media, ‘yellow press’ newspapers and consultancy websites as your sources. Reputable national and regional newspapers and magazines, websites of reputable non-governmental organisations and commercial and non-profit organisations, government sources and academic journals and books are acceptable.
The references are formatted correctly both in the text and the references pages. Please use either an APA or Harvard referencing style and make sure that you use correct formatting (e.g. the sources should be listed in the reference page in an alphabetical order).
 
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STRATEGY IN CONTEXT BHS0035

                        Criteria EXPLANATION
Case Study Content
Your case study answers the questions set out in the assignment brief. The assignment asks you to explain why a particular organisation made a particular strategic decision. Your completed case study should focus on this explanation. Simply describing the decision, providing an external and/or internal analysis of the organisation, or evaluating the quality of the decision will not answer the assignment question.
The discussion in the case study is informed by relevant theory. Your explanations of why your chosen organisation made the decision must be grounded in theory. In other words, when searching for explanations, you must consider factors set out in the various theoretical perspectives we discussed in this module. You are expected to use a minimum of three or four different theoretical perspectives.
Please avoid exclusively relying on basic planning models such as PESTLE and SWOT. Using basic planning models only will result in a basic pass mark at best.
Your writing demonstrates a solid understanding of the theoretical perspectives you are using. Please make sure that you understand the theoretical perspectives and models you use very well – e.g. what they are intended for, how they work and how they are related to other perspectives.
You are not required to explain in your case study the theoretical perspectives you use. However, the way you use concepts and ideas from those perspectives will provide an indication of your understanding.
Your case study is based on thorough research of your organisation’s decision, the organisation itself and the situation within which the decision was made. You are expected to use a variety of sources to obtain information about your chosen organisation, about the decision that you are analysing and about any relevant circumstantial factors (e.g. various aspects of the external and internal environment, important stakeholders, organisational processes, etc.). Relying on just one or two sources will most likely not be enough.
Please also be aware of potential biases – e.g. your organisation’s own accounts of how the decision was made may not be objective.
Your case study should address the power dimension of organisational decision-making. In your analysis, you should consider how the various forces both in the internal and external environment of the organisation forced or encouraged the organisation to make the decision. These forces may have exerted a direct coercive impact on the organisation (e.g. stakeholder demands), facilitated the decision (e.g. existence of particular resource sets), or set out the boundaries for organisational imagination (e.g. organisational culture and structure). You should also consider the relationships between the various forces.
Case Study Structure
Your case study has a clear introduction. The introduction should provide a brief overview of the organisation that you chose and the decision that you will be explaining. It should contain a phrase such as “In this case study, I will explain how an organisation X reached the decision Y”. You can also provide a brief list of the theoretical perspectives you will use.
Your case study is a coherent narrative. You present your points/arguments in a logical sequence. The structure of the main body of the case study should support a clear communication of the results of your analysis. As this is a fairly long case study, you should split it into several sections. Each section should deal with a specific topic – e.g. background information, the description of the decision-making process, a particular influencing factor, or the discussion of the relationship between particular influencing factors.
Please do not title the main body of your case study “Main body”. The words “main body” are simply used to denote the main substantive section of a piece of writing. They are not an appropriate section title.
The case study must have a clear conclusion, summarising the findings of your analysis. In your conclusion, you should provide a clear outline the key reasons why your organisation made the decision.
Evidence and Referencing
All arguments you make must be supported by evidence, either theoretical or empirical. Your arguments and explanations should be based on thorough research and careful consideration of relevant evidence. Avoid making arguments without supporting them with relevant evidence.
All non-common-knowledge facts and arguments are referenced. You should provide a clear indication of the sources of your evidence by thoroughly referencing your writing. Please use either an APA or Harvard referencing style.
The sources used are up-to-date and appropriate for an academic work Avoid using blogs, social media, ‘yellow press’ newspapers and consultancy websites as your sources. Reputable national and regional newspapers and magazines, websites of reputable non-governmental organisations and commercial and non-profit organisations, government sources and academic journals and books are acceptable.
The references are formatted correctly both in the text and the references pages. Please use either an APA or Harvard referencing style and make sure that you use correct formatting (e.g. the sources should be listed in the reference page in an alphabetical order).
 
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